<div dir="auto"><div><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr"> <<a href="mailto:colecmac@protonmail.com" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">colecmac@protonmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">> 3.  ASCII tables are anything but screenreader friendly, since there's no<br>
>     semantic information about the table's structure.<br>
<br>
Yes, that's the main problem in my opinion. I don't see a great solution really.<br>
Perhaps if the word table is in the alt text (an unofficial idea, which is the<br>
text right after the first backtick line), a really good client could interpret<br>
where the cells are and read them? It would be error-prone of course, and still<br>
not very accessible.<br></blockquote></div></div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">Unofficial? It's in section "5.4.3 Preformatting toggle lines" in the spec.</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">The proper way to use alt text in this case is to describe the information in the table as if you are talking to someone on the phone, essentially duplicating the information in prose. This can get tedious in big tables.</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">For simple two column tables, you could replace them with lists.</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">-- </div><div dir="auto">Katarina</div></div>